Sustainably Queer is Officially Back in Action!

 
 Art in Bloom, North Carolina Museum of Art. March 2018.

Art in Bloom, North Carolina Museum of Art. March 2018.

 

Oh, hi there. It’s been a few years, hasn’t it? Sustainably Queer was on hiatus for a while and perhaps you thought you’d seen the last of our plucky queer urban homesteading blog. Well, we’re excited to say that we’re bringing SQ back! We’re bursting with ideas and things to share, but first let’s catch up on what we’ve been up to since our last post in the summer of 2015.

 Riding the kiddie train on Rachel's birthday. Pullen Park, September 2017.

Riding the kiddie train on Rachel's birthday. Pullen Park, September 2017.

Back then, we were living in Chicago. Kristl owned a busy acupuncture clinic on the North Side and Rachel was planning on working in urban agriculture in the city, while adding more interesting content to SQ. In May of 2015, Rachel was diagnosed with a serious infection that required emergency surgery, over a week in the hospital, and months of home health care. We initially tried to keep the blog going, but it proved to be more than we could handle at the time.

This life and death emergency caused us to reevaluate our priorities and shake things up a bit. Kristl sold her practice and we moved to the Triangle area of North Carolina in the fall of 2015. Our transition to North Carolina was a bit rocky and, sadly, sustainability ended up taking a backseat as we focused on merely surviving for a while there. Some of the upsides were that we started (and later ended) a business through which we launched a podcast, taught some online courses, and, most importantly, learned a ton about ourselves. Also, Rachel was able to do some work for a production farm and we’ve been able to spend way more time out in nature - hiking, kayaking and exploring - now that it’s so close to home.

During our first two years in North Carolina, we lived in Chapel Hill, which is very much a college town and we never quite felt like we fit there. We have recently moved to nearby Durham, and it has proved to be a much-needed shift. Durham really feels like home and has helped us get our groove back, y’all!

Durham might not always register nationally when it comes to sustainability initiatives and green living, but this city is known for grassroots work and there are tons of folks pushing hard to make Durham more sustainable. We’ve only been living here a few months and we have so many cool programs and businesses to tell you about, like Durham GreenToGo, Fillaree, CompostNow, Ungraded Produce, Don’t Waste Durham, and more!

 At a solar eclipse party put on by the Museum of Life and Science in Durham. August 2017.

At a solar eclipse party put on by the Museum of Life and Science in Durham. August 2017.

In personal news, Rachel has recently started as the Sustainability Steward of Pie Pan Inc, a small restaurant group in town which is a B Corp--a Benefit Corporation, benefiting People, Planet, and profit, in that order--and she’s been having a blast helping them with both their environmental sustainability efforts as well as advising on the sustainability of the business as a whole. Kristl has been working remotely for a tech company for about 18 months and she loves it. It’s basically the best combination of the flexibility you get from entrepreneurship and the stability you get from a job - she couldn’t imagine a better job for her.

We’re looking forward to writing about sustainability in Durham and also about our experience being queer in Durham and the culture of the US South. We excited about creating posts that will give you actionable info to help you live more sustainably, and throwing in some personal reflection/info posts--because we all know how popular “Nine on the Ninth” used to be (New readers: feel free to search the archives for those gems.)

We hope you are here for the next phase of Sustainably Queer, because we’re here, we’re queer, and we’re reducing, reusing AND recycling. If there’s any content you want to see from us, be sure to reach out at hello(at)sustainablyqueer(dot)com and follow us on social media. We’d love to hear from you!

Sustainably Queer - On Hiatus

On Hiatus Post
On Hiatus Post

Hello everyone! It's been an interesting summer for us! As you may have noticed, if you were a constant reader or a casual observer of date stamps, that our blogging has dropped off in recent months. We are officially on hiatus. We are still very sustainable and very queer. However, a rash of personal circumstances have caused us to be less available for spending time with Sustainably Queer this season.

Don't worry though! We have every intention of continuing to create content in some  way, shape or form when the seas calm down. We've even been tossing around the idea of a podcast! [Update: We did it! We published 2 seasons of our podcast "The Joy Patrol Show" and had a blast doing it. Who knows? We may revisit podcasting for SQ content in the future!]

Until then, you can follow us on our personal Instagrams - @kristlyuen and @schipmoney - to see what we've been up to lately (and find pictures of our pets because that's what Instagram is for, right?). If you want to get in touch, you can always reach us at sustainablyqueer@gmail.com.

SQ Nature Break - 10 Day Instagram Challenge

It’s June in Chicago. Which means that it’s sometimes warm and sometimes cool, but it really does feel good to get outside. However, for a lot of city dwellers, those of us at SQ included, we still find ourselves cooped up inside regardless of the weather, working, starting at computers, and not really enjoying all that nature has to offer. No matter where you live, it can be a struggle to disconnect and go sit out in the yard for a few.

So, we wanted to issue a challenge and make it visual. We want you to commit to 10 days of spending at least 10 minutes outside, in a spot of your choosing, and post a pic each day on Instagram, with the hashtag #SQNatureBreak.

Sounds easy, right?

Challenges are all about commitment and accountability. We’ll be participating right along with you, but we want to know who is in.

Sign up through this link and we’ll send you an intro email the day the challenge starts with some suggestions to make it go smoothly. If you don’t use Instagram, you are still welcome to participate, you can even post the pictures in our Facebook Group!

Remember, this is about taking a break from the hustle and bustle and chilling out with the birds and the trees. Or the bees, if you are into that. Everybody needs a  little SQ Nature Break.

The challenge starts Wednesday, June 17th, sign up today!

Five Food and Homesteading Goals for 2015

Happy New Year from Sustainably Queer! Before we take on the ARDUOUS task of tasting a whole slate of butters on tangy sourdough bread, we thought we'd write a quick post a post to inform you of our food and homesteading goals for 2015.

1. Eat no processed sugar - This includes white sugar, brown sugar, High Fructose Corn Syrup, other corn syrups, other processed sweeteners that are called by other names, etc. We will eat products that include honey, maple syrup, and molasses (we understand it's byproduct of sugar refining, but it has a much higher nutritional value than sugar because of this), but not in large quantities. We will make exceptions to this goal for very special occasions, but in general, we will try to avoid sugar in general, because of the effect that it has on the brain and the gut flora.

2. Cook at home at least five days a week - We recently did a 21-day purification program (let us know if you want more info - we actually really enjoyed it!) that forced us to cook at home every day for at least two of those three weeks. This took a little bit of getting used to, but once we got into the swing of it, we realized we were saving a lot of money, and eating really well (The program started with 10 days of just vegetables, fruits, seeds, and fats, with protein shakes, then you could add back in lean meats on day 11.) We learned a lot of recipes that are easy and delicious (veggie garam masala, baked salmon, mashed cauliflower with mushrooms, roasted lemon broccoli, broccoli cauliflower soup, etc). We love to cook and we're glad to be back in the kitchen in 2015.

3. Season our cast iron and actually start using it - We have three beautiful cast iron pans that are sitting in the trunk of our car, two old, unseasoned pans that were given to us, and one that we took camping and totally covered in soot. They have been in the trunk of our car for eighteen months. Literally. We have Teflon pans that are slowly killing us and cast iron that is waiting to set us free. Look forward to a post chronicling our experience.

4. Buy even more of our food from local sources - As you can tell from many of our previous posts, we are all about supporting the local economy and small businesses.  We want to know about small, local businesses who are committed to sustainability and are using quality ingredients and  products to make their goods. We have a goal to increase our knowledge of these businesses and our patronage of them. The stronger the web of the local economy, the easier it will be for these businesses to survive, and that creates jobs and a myriad of other good things.

5. Make more of our own products at home - As you can imagine, not every item we want to buy can be sourced locally (yet), so we have to buy some things from places like Target (though we do try to patronize small businesses over corporations whenever we can). There's no shame in going to Target now and then, but we are going to do our best to be more intentional about what we buy there. Is this something I can make at home? Then I should make it at home, instead of buying a processed, packaged version. Our final goal is to make what we can at home, be it deodorant, dish soap, laundry detergent, pickled carrots, belts, or just dinner at home.

Ok, those are our simple food and homesteading goals for 2015!  Feel free to play along and share some of your goals with us! And once again Happy New Year!

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(And we'll get back to the conclusion of our Ninety-Nine Favorite Things list shortly!)

Ninety-Nine Things We Like - Part Three - Local Foods Edition

We love local food. We love the artistry and intention that goes into making products that you cannot find anywhere else in the country. You simply cannot go to the Pacific Northwest or the Piedmont of the South and find products like these. You can find other beautiful, delicious things, but we can claim something special about our region and we should celebrate it. Yeah! Now from the list below, not all of the items are 100% Chicago-sourced (we don't grow chocolate in the Midwest, sadly), but they were put together here in the city, the state, or, at the very least, the region (the furthest away is Ann Arbor, MI). There are a couple reasons why this is important to us here at Sustainably Queer. First, when products are coming from nearby, fewer resources are used to deliver to us. That means there's a lower carbon footprint for those products, and there is a pretty good chance that the products will be more fresh when we receive them especially since, depending on the item, we could go directly to the source. Also, we have the opportunity to get to know the producer. Quite a few of the folks listed below have booths or attend the Good Food Festival in March (at UIC), and we met a number of them this past year. We tasted their products; we shook their hands; we got hooked. When there is good food involved, we are all over it.

Alright, so here are a few of our favorite local products, remember the numbering continues from our previous post about our favorite local sustainable restaurants:

38. Co-Op Hot Sauces - We have been enjoying Co-Op Hot Sauces since Kristl ordered Rachel a four-pack via Groupon Grassroots in 2012. The company was established in 2003 and they use all local peppers to make their sauces. They are part of the team that makes up the cafe Sauce and Bread Kitchen on Ashland Avenue. They make their own sriracha (Chi-racha) which is really delightful.

39. North Shore Distillery - We decided to only officially include this distillery, because this is the only one that we have personally purchased from, but Rachel has enjoyed spirits from Few and Koval as well. Pre-epilepsy diagnosis, Rachel's drink of choice was a gin and tonic, and she very much enjoyed North Shore's Gin No. 6, but you really cannot go wrong with any of these companies if you want to enjoy well crafted spirits from a local distillery.

Kristl poses with Arize Kombucha at The Plant during Open House Chicago

40. Arize Kombucha - We bought three cases of Arize Kombucha for our recent wedding celebration, because Nathan from Arize brings the same artistry and small batch mindset to kombucha brewing that many craft brewers bring to beer. People who had never before tried kombucha were really impressed with its subtle flavors and the fizzy, sour punch it holds. Arize is available from small, local grocers, (even on-tap at True Nature!) listed below.

41. The Brinery – The Brinery is one of those gems we unearthed at the Good Food Festival and have never reburied. They are located just outside Ann Arbor, Michigan and have the best sauerkraut ever. They also make exceptional kimchi. They make all the lacto-fermented foods that we would love to make on our own time (and eventually, hopefully, we will), but for now we are thrilled to have a source that will make legit fermented foods without additives. If you live closer to Ann Arbor, you can get fancier things from The Brinery or you can pay a lot of money to have them shipped, like their obscenely popular fermented sriracha that sells out very quickly: it MUST be worth it. We buy their products from Urban Orchard in Andersonville.

42. Kalona SuperNatural (Whole Fat Products) - If you are going to spend the money to buy high quality products like Kalona and then get the reduced fat version of them, we need to have a talk. Low fat products almost always have added sugar and other stabilizers. Whole fat products are only 4% fat, so it's really not that big of a difference, considering the processing the product goes through to remove 2% fat. Anyways, Iowa is right around the corner and Kalona's butter, cottage cheese, milk, etc, is pretty much always our first choice for dairy.

43. Bee-Bop Honey - We chose to have Bee-Bop supply the favors for our wedding celebration, and we have definitely gotten rave reviews. We did not go into this blind though. Kelly has a couple of hives on the south side of Chicago (which we have visited!) and her bees collect honey from wild flowers and gardens all over her neighborhood. We found Bee-Bop honey at Virtu, a boutique in Wicker Park, just sitting on a shelf, and we loved it. We decided we needed more and went straight to the source through Kelly's Etsy page.

44. Bike-a-Bee - As a disclaimer, we haven't bought this honey, but we have tasted it. It was available for tasting and purchasing at farmers markets last summer, but we were overwhelmed with wedding honey. We did want to include Bike-a-Bee, however, because the concept is so gosh darn clever.  One woman, with some helpers, has fifteen different beehives in different sites that she manages by bike. Brilliant. It's low impact and it's simple.  Let's think of more start-ups like this.

45. Vosges Chocolate - Now we enter the phase of this post where we talk about sweets for a while. Don't be mad. Vosges is a Chicago company, and the creator, Katrina Markoff, has a very ambitious commitment to sustainability. Their website indicates that all of their packaging is 100% post-consumer recycled material, that they have recently started growing their own chocolate in Belize, in order to control the supply chain from start to finish, while upholding fair labor laws. Also, it's delicious chocolate. We highly recommend the blush caramels with Hawaiian red sea salt and li hing powder, but you cannot go wrong, whatever you choose.

46. Katherine Anne Confections - Katherine Anne is an establishment at farmers markets and craft fairs around Chicago, year round. She sells show-stopping caramels, marshmallows, fudge, and other treats. She doesn't use artificial ingredients or anything you wouldn't be able to find on a farm, like the dairy farm she grew up on (with the exception of chocolate, which as we mentioned at the outset, is not local to the Midwest). Her offerings change seasonally, as they should, and they are always a delight.

47. GrownUp KidStuff - These folks are not shy about getting people to taste their menagerie of chocolate sauces, so if you've been to a craft fair, or visited the Galleria in Andersonville on the weekend, it is possible your taste buds are already familiar with their product line. That being said, GrownUp KidStuff is a very simple company selling a very simple product that is very simply delicious. We have only purchased the spicy chocolate hot sauce, which is funny because Kristl doesn't like spicy things, but it was palatable for her, and the person having us taste things suggested that we make a balsamic vinegar reduction with the spicy chocolate sauce and put it over vegetables. That got us to buy it. We only did it once, and we've eaten it over ice cream every other time. Weird, I know.

48. Butter Bella Shortbread Cookies - Ok, so the website for Butter Bella does not give a lot of specific information about the quality of their ingredients, but they do indicate that their cookies are made with "pure" ingredients in small batches for high quality. Now, if my palate can be trusted, these claims can be completely substantiated, because these are the best shortbread cookies I have ever encountered. We love all of the flavors, but the lemon and the mocha are particularly nice. Whole Foods carries them at most locations in the "International Cookies" bins, and they have plastic cartons of larger cookies as well. (This is one of the rare cookies that Kristl has been completely unable to recreate in the kitchen. When we want shortbread cookies, we buy Butter Bella. Done.)

49. C&D Farms - A couple of our friends got together and gifted us very generously with a meat share from C&D Farms for our wedding celebration earlier this year.  C&D Farms specifically raises happy hogs on their own land and then they have very close relationships with other small, intentional livestock producers in the area to bring a truck full of animal products to the city several times a week. Thanks, Jess and Sarah!

50. Mint Creek Farm - Mint Creek is really the Cadillac of local sustainable meat, and while they raise a variety of animals, they are known for their lamb. The farm is known for being biodynamic, which means, they not only use the land, but they intelligently give back to it to improve the soil and water quality around them. Mint Creek Meat is available at most large farmers markets in Chicago and they have CSAs available. We buy from them for special occasions, like last Thanksgiving, we were able to get a fresh, never-frozen turkey from them and it was the best thing on earth. Or at least the best turkey I've consumed. We actually visited the farm during our mini-moon after our legal wedding last year and the animals really seemed happy. They were all on pasture and well cared for.

51. Rishi Tea - Rishi Tea has really become the gold standard of loose leaf tea, at least in this region. If you are going to an independent coffee house in Chicago, and you choose tea, 4 out of 5 times, you are going to be choosing from a selection of Rishi Teas. Rishi's headquarters is in Milwaukee, but they source their teas from organic, fair trade locations in asia or locally, depending on the type of tea. The tea is fantastic and there aren't weird flavors or additives to make it taste fake.

52. Cafe Chicago - Now I know that people have very strong opinions about their coffee, but this group is worth buying a bag just to try. We are not coffee drinkers, but we heard the founder's story at, where else, the Good Food Festival last year and we are determined share the brilliance of the Chicago Coffee Co-op with our readers semi-annually. Café Chicago is a worker-made, worker-run cooperative that roasts, packages, and distributes great tasting, fair trade, organic coffee in the Chicago area. I know True Nature sells their coffee, at least, give it a whirl.

53. Tomato Mountain - We love Tomato Mountain for a couple reasons.  First, they are a beautiful organic farm, they follow sustainable practices, they are a great source of sustainable produce, and they come to markets in Chicago all the time, even the winter.  They are good people and good farmers.  We also like them because they not only grow wonderful fresh produce, but they convert it into delicious cottage goods, like salsas and tomato jams for the winter. (Although, when we buy their tomato jam it rarely makes it through the weekend.) People from many different states have been gifted their Sungold tomato jam courtesy of us truly. They are worth checking out for tomato goods or a CSA from WI. (They deliver their CSA to your door!)

Radical Root Green House

54. Radical Root Organic Farm - I think we have a soft spot for Radical Root in our SQ heart of hearts because we've kind of watched them grow from their farm incubator space, donated to their greenhouse construction, participated in their egg share, and Rachel even spent a day working on their farm. If there's a para-urban farm that we know best, it's Radical Root, and they're just really nice and knowledgeable. If you are looking for farmers in IL, with a CSA including eggs, who also comes to farmer's markets in the city, these are your farmers. If you want a more in-depth write up on Radical Root, check out the Farm Focus we did on them back in May.

55. Peck & Bushel Fruit Company - There's a weird thing about apples. They are absolutely the number one most pesticide ridden fruit out there, but we totally want to go scamper among the trees, biting into apples willy nilly, bringing our children and casting caution to the wind. Well, if you can get your caution back from the wind, there are two orchards within a reasonable driving distance of Chicago that do offer You Pick weekends for organic apples. Peck & Bushel is outside Milwaukee and they have a lot of interesting apple varieties. (Always be sure to call before you go, because sometimes the You Pick days and times do shift, as it is a small operation.) The other organic You Pick is Earth's First Farms in Berrien Center, MI. Their products are more widely available in Chicago at Farmer's Markets and small groceries. The varieties they have for You Pick are a little more traditional, so if that's your bag, you might want to try them instead.

56. Joe's Blueberries - We have been to Joe's Blueberries twice to pick blueberries, and both times we came home with over ten pounds of amazing berries to freeze for the winter. Joe's grows blueberries with no pesticides or chemicals, and the berries are plump, sweet, and abundant. Unfortunately, we've already used up all our blueberries from this past summer, BUT the website has informed us that there are a couple stores in Chicago where they keep frozen blueberries in stock all year 'round. Thank goodness! (They also have gift cards!)

57. Rushing Waters Trout - This is a company that took advantage of the beautiful "rushing waters" in Palmyra, WI to create a semi-natural trout farm. They raise the fish using chemical-free aquaculture practices and then catch, process, smoke, and sell it on site and also, conveniently for us, in Chicago at a number of different locations. The fish is delicious and they also have dips. Yum!

58. Farmed Here - Rachel was lucky enough to visit Farmed Here as part of her Urban Agriculture class, and it is a very interesting company. They started out using the concept of aquaponics to grow primarily basil for markets such as Whole Foods, and now they have expanded to sell microgreens and lettuce mixes. Their business model is solid and their products are beautiful, plus they are one of the players in the game providing undeniably local produce to the Chicago market twelve months a year with no chance of environmental factors to interrupt that.

59. Phoenix Bean - Our last offering on this list that is a food product and not a grocer is Phoenix Bean.  They are a staple at Chicago area farmer's markets and they are not shy about providing samples. There are two very compelling reasons to buy from Phoenix bean over other tofu producers: 1. They are local, their plant is located in Edgewater, and 2. They do not use GMO soy beans to make their products. So, for those of us in Chicago, if we want tofu (and it is really good tofu) or other tofu products, like salads and marinaded tofu, this is your go to place. (Also, we should note that you can buy a limited selection of their products directly from the factory for a lower cost, especially if you only want regular tofu, it's a good deal. Otherwise, farmer's markets are the best place to get the full range of products.)

INTERMISSION: We thought we would be remiss if we did not include in this post a short list of places where we purchase these products. There is no way we can guarantee that they will all be available at every location obviously, but all of these markets are very much connected to the local food scene.

60. Dill Pickle Co-Op - Dill Pickle is, as far as we know (and believe me, we would like to be proven wrong) the only currently open brick and mortar co-op in existence in Chicago. Co-ops are awesome because they are non-profits, run by democratic process, and exist to connect communities to their food and to each other. Dill Pickle was created by Logan Square residents for Logan Square residents, but we have visited a few times, and picked up our fresh, never-frozen Mint Creek turkey there, because they are also a hub for Urban Agriculture businesses to sell their wares in a consistent way.  If you live in or near Logan Square, we highly recommend checking out Dill Pickle.

61. New Leaf Natural Grocery - New Leaf is a tiny baby grocery store (like it's one loop around that's it), but they have a little of everything and it's competitively priced. So, as soon as you know they exist, they are totally there for you in a pinch. Their location is a short walk from our house, so if we realize we have run out of a vital ingredient, one of us can sprint to New Leaf and pick it up. They also offer weekly grocery boxes and home delivery of said boxes, which is probably very convenient for some people. (I, Rachel, like to personally select (pick up and scrutinize) all of my fruits and vegetables, as you might imagine. Kristl, on the other hand, wants to try the weekly grocery box because she's sick of buying groceries 2-3 times a week.)

62. Urban Orchard - Urban Orchard has done some reorganizing since they first opened to really become a very functional and accessible grocery in the heart of Andersonville. They are one of the few stores we've found in the city that sells products from The Brinery and they have gone out of their way to source local, sustainably produced products. They also have a full coffee bar, if that's what you're into.

63. True Nature - This place is our number one source for eggs, meat, and kombucha. More than any other place currently in Edgewater, True Nature strives to provide the products and processes that make it easier to live a sustainable lifestyle in our neighborhood. They were able to stay in business across the street from Dominick's and now they are coming up with ways to stay in business with the challenge of an incoming Whole Foods in Summer 2015. And unless Whole Foods starts sourcing hyper local cheese, meat, honey, eggs, etc, we think True Nature will still survive. (AND they have a green waste composting program, rad!) We buy most of our meat here, as they have an affordable meat co-op with a lot of variety available. As a side note, True Nature is the biggest supplier of Arize Kombucha on the northside. They have a tap, growlers you can fill, and an a assortment of 16 oz bottles available almost all the time. If you want to try Arize one cup at a time, this is the place to give it a whirl.

64. Southport Grocery - Southport Grocery easily could have slid onto our sustainable restaurants list, but they call themselves a grocery first, so here they are on the grocery docket. But hey, if you are looking for a brunch place on Southport, this is really your best option. In terms of grocery items, Southport Grocery really hits it out of the park with beautiful locally sourced cottage goods. I don't know if you would absolutely go here if you were not already planning on eating here or were walking down Southport for something else, but it's good to know it exists, and certainly, if you live in the area and you need some Co-Op Sauce or GrownUp KidStuff for a gift, this grocery is your best friend.

Chicago Market's photo tweet of the day we joined.

65. Chicago Market - We think we've saved the best for last, but part of that is because it doesn't exist yet, at least not as a store where you can buy things. Chicago lacks a large scale co-op where smaller cities in the region, like Champaign-Urbana, Madison, and Milwaukee have large thriving co-ops or even co-ops that have multiple locations (See Outpost in Milwaukee). A community co-op like Dill Pickle is awesome and important, but it doesn't have the member numbers and bargaining power to promote change in the market the way that a larger co-op will. Chicago Market's timeline is to open in fall of 2015, this thing is really happening! We are members, many of our friends are members, and it's something that we hope our readers would consider as well. They also have memberships available for gifts, if you need an awesome gift for a local, foodie friend of yours.

All the small businesses above and many others need places to sell their goods. It's very hard to get started in that, especially if your strength is in growing vegetables, for example, and not business. A market that guarantees a fair price for producers and a good product for consumers is a win-win all around. Rachel spent last summer working at a farmer's market; getting up early, doing lots of heavy lifting, and spending all day selling vegetables for $400-500 profit is a lot of hard work for not much pay-off, and that was in a wealthy suburb. Most urban farms are on the south side of Chicago where vegetables aren't "worth" as much.

It's unlikely that the emergence of Chicago Market will push Whole Foods out of Chicago or that the other small stores we mentioned will be threatened by it.  A co-op holds a different place in ethos of the city's grocery budget, and it's something Chicago has been desperately lacking.  If you have any interest in joining the Chicago Market, you can get more information here, or feel free to ask us questions. The initial investment is high, but they do have a payment plan which makes it really easy. (Ten payments of $25 is really inexpensive way to help an awesome source of local, sustainable food succeed!)

This concludes our post on local goods, please click here for part one of our list on our favorite local charities, here for part two on our favorite sustainable restaurants, and keep an eye here for part four on other local businesses and artists we love that you might want to check out. Huzzah!

Ninety-Nine Things We Like - Part Two - Restaurant Edition

It's time for us to continue our list of favorite things and this is a chunk of our very favorite restaurants in Chicago, which are very near and dear to our hearts.  We love food more than pretty much anything else and it's very important to us that our food choices do not have a a negative impact on the world around us. We chose these specific restaurants because they go out of their way to do one or more of the following things:

  • Source local produce, meat, eggs, dairy etc in season
  • Grow their own produce locally or onsite
  • Choose to serve meat that was raised sustainably or at least without added antibiotics/hormones
  • Change their menu to reflect the season and do not exhaust resources to serve dishes out of season
  • Do significant prep work, brewing, or baking on site, little of their food is pre-made or processed
  • Go back to original recipes or sources to provide the most interesting/nourishing meals possible

That being said, here is a short list of our favorite restaurants in Chicago, feast away Chicago friends (Note - the numbering is contiguous from the previous post so that we get to ninety-nine one day!):

Brunch at Gather - these might be Kristl's favorite potatoes

17. Gather - Our favorite restaurant in the city right now. We usually get two appetizers and then share a main. We particularly love their hamburger, arctic char, and crispy breakfast potatoes (only available at brunch on Sundays). Woah. They have precise seasonal menus, source a portion of their food, and the portions are large and affordable.  Lovely atmosphere, but be sure to make a reservation on the weekend! Oh and most days the owner is the host and does the seating, because he cares. (If you see brussels sprouts on the menu, you simply must order them.)

18. Edzo’s - This is an old school burger joint with your choice of sustainably sourced meats to choose from. There are also a dozen different types of fries and daily specials to keep you on your toes. The Lincoln Park location just closed, but the Evanston spot is going strong.

19. Hopleaf - They source some of their produce from urban farms on the south side and change their menu to match the season. They do the same with the beers on tap, if that's what you're in to. The food is delicious and they have a lot of room for gatherings, as long as you check their calendar first, because when it's busy, it's packed.

20. Frontera Fresco - The smallest and least renowned of Rick Bayless's offerings have brought us the most joy. We go to Frontera Fresco in the mall at Old Orchard and get tacos almost every time we are there. It's nice to know that there is some mall food coming from local farms and the meat is relatively well sourced too.

Dukbokki with Bulgogi at Dak

21. Dak - The most meager in terms of sustainability (though they do use antibiotic- and hormone-free meat),  but they have made up for in some sense by being really convenient and delicious for us.  We just wish they would stop using styrofoam for carryout. Sigh. (When we remember, we bring our own containers for leftovers when we eat in.)

22. Nightwood - We heard about Nightwood for their brunches, specifically the donuts, but we've only been there for dinner and drinks.  They made Kristl a truly excellent non-alcoholic cocktail, which is hard to find, though we found that the appetizers far outshone the entrees. Maybe someday we shall return for brunch.

23. Sola - We go to Sola anytime we need a fix of upscale food with Hawaii in mind.  It's not Hawaiian per say, but Chef Carol Wallack's love of Hawaii definitely shines through.  Menus are seasonal, which we love, and often feature a seasonal ingredient. They try to source locally and sustainably as much as possible, and if you are salivating over something on the brunch menu, go early because they will run out (sadly, we speak from personal experience)!

We had to taste a bunch of pies to narrow it down to only two for our wedding reception

24. Hoosier Mama - What is there to say except that these pies will ruin you? We've probably tried twenty flavors and I haven't been upset about any of them. And no, we aren't going bankrupt eating pie, they have a pie flight after 6pm everyday where you can choose 3 pies and get smaller slices of all three to try. Seriously though, they use great ingredients and old recipes. They also sell sandwiches and salads and have a full coffee bar at their Evanston location. (We had two Hoosier Mama pies in the dessert buffet at our wedding!)

25. Bang Bang - Nestled down in Logan Square is another great place to get pie, but to be honest the last time I was there I didn't even think about pie. No. I did, however, have biscuits three different ways. Oh, yes.  Just go there with like three other people, and order all the biscuits, and eat biscuits until you can't move. Don't worry, they only use seasonal fruit and the leaf lard that goes into their baking is rendered specifically for them by one farm. Magic.

26. Honey Butter Fried Chicken - We were recently talking with a fried who had just eaten at HBFC for the first time and we were gushing about how DE-licious it is and he was like yeah, but it's not cheap. It's true, it's not cheap, but that's because Honey Butter is not your corner shop that tastes good only because it's fried and is gonna violate health codes every 6 months or so. This place is legitimately tasty and legitimately sustainable. See their philosophy here. All that being said, I highly recommend "Da Club" sandwich, and the regular old fried chicken with honey butter. Yes.

27. Leghorn Fried Chicken - Not as high-brow as Honey Butter, but these are Amish chickens as well and the other classy thing about Leghorn is that when they sell out, they close up. Boom, done. Check out the menu before you go, because you have to be ready to choose which type of brine you want, which type of meat, any sides, sauces, or toppings.  It can be stressful, but it's so worth it. We're partial to the pickle-brined thigh on a biscuit, Rachel gets it hot, Kristl doesn't, but we're sure you'll love whatever you get!

28. Big Jones - If you want real Southern cooking and not some mockery of it, then you really must go to Big Jones. Big Jones uses heirloom recipes from the deep South to inform all that they do in the kitchen and also how they source their ingredients, all they way down to the grains that they use to make their griddlecakes. One surprising result of this is that their brunch is now gluten free. Naturally, not intentionally, because all the heirloom flours used in southern cooking didn't include gluten to begin with. For dinner, we tend to fill up on starters and share a main, but you do you.

29. Brown Trout - I guess you could just go ahead and say that we are fried chicken fanatics, because fried chicken brought us to Brown Trout too.  We have had other lovely dinners at this in-your-face sustainable restaurant, but the best use of your time and money, in our opinion, is Sunday night fried chicken and blue grass. They cook the chicken sous vide first and then batter and fry it to perfection. So juicy and wonderful. Dark meat highly recommended.

30. Revolution Brewing - Whether or not you enjoy their beer, the pub is worth a visit. They have small rooftop for growing vegetables in the summer and they butcher a pig or two a week from a local farm. The food is really well thought through and very good. And let's be real, who is mad about sustainable pub food? Not us.

31. Sauce and Bread - This small cafe is the child of two companies - Crumb bakery and Co-Op hot sauce - and it is a beautiful baby. Both businesses continue to exist in their own right, but Sauce and Bread is the location where their magic meets.  They have limited hours, but it's wonderful for a low key brunch or an afternoon snack - we actually had our post-wedding brunch there and they were incredibly nice and accommodating.  They also host a supper club that we have every intention of weaseling our way into sometime.

32. Au Cheval - It's the upscale diner of your dreams. There are burgers everywhere. It's impossibly delicious. A single is a double. A double is a triple. They make their own baloney. If you go at a busy time there is often a 2-hour wait, so we suggest going at an off-time. And let's be real, now is a good time. You have no excuses. We dragged ourselves there during one of the many frigid polar vortex days last winter because we figured (correctly) that we wouldn't have to wait.

Pea soup with roasted lemon puree and breaded goat cheese at Kendall this past spring

33. Dining Room at Kendall College - Kendall College is known for culinary arts and hospitality in Chicago and you can take part in this tradition by making a reservation at their dining room and seeing what the students can do.  We recommend going with a partner or a friend for lunch, because we've found that the lunch menus are more interesting and two-top tables tend to get extras. One time we got several extra appetizers thrown our way and we weren't mad about it. Kendall has a commitment to sustainable, locally sourced ingredients, and the price is right too.

34. Cafe Spiaggia (for Restaurant Week) - Restaurant Week is a potentially good thing that can turn out to not be that great of a deal depending on where you go, but we think we've really found a spot that delivers a deal and really excellent food. Go to Cafe Spiaggia. The food is as good as actual Italian food from Italy (which we can say having recently been to Italy), and the Restaurant Week deal is actually a deal. It's classy, it's wonderful, and it's delicious.

35. Pleasant House Bakery - Finally, Pleasant House Bakery is a great place to get British style savory pies. They grow a lot of their own vegetables during the growing season. They make their own sodas, and they have specials on different days of the week. We highly recommend their Tuesday Burger. Yum. They are also selling the pies they make in house under the name Royal Pies around Chicago at local groceries.

Jeni's!

36. Jeni's Splendid Ice Cream - This is the only chain on this list, but it's a midwest chain (based in Columbus, OH) that uses local, seasonal, sustainable ingredients whenever possible. Jeni's is amazing. Some of our favorites are the Askinosie Dark Milk Chocolate, Brown Butter Almond Brittle, Goat Cheese with Red Cherries, Sweet Corn with Black Raspberries, and The Buckeye State. The ice cream sandwiches (many of which are gluten-free) are mind-blowing. We rarely eat ice cream these days, but when we do, it's Jeni's.

37. Ras Dashen - We went to Ras Dashen last night and were delighted to see a notice that they are now using local, antibiotic-, steroid-, and hormone-free chicken from Gunthorp Farms. We love Ethiopian food and we are often hard pressed to choose a favorite.  In general, the cuisine is pretty friendly for vegetarians, vegans, and gluten-free folks, and the crepe-like injera bread is fermented before it is cooked making it easier to digest and better for your gut flora. Our runner up Ethiopian recommendation would definitely be Lalibela on Ashland, which always has gluten-free injera on tap and is a little cheaper.

So, those are our recommendations at this time, we hope that you give a few of them a try. We hope that you love them as much as we do. We also hope that if you are going to try one out and have a bad experience, that you let us know, because we will probably leave this page up and wouldn't want people to  go on having bad food experiences in Chicago forever. This list is by no means exhaustive, as there are many delicious restaurants in Chicago and a number of them have sustainable practices. Our goal for 2015 is to hit up all the ones we've missed so far!

Please click HERE to explore part one of the Ninety-Nine things we like, and here is the link to part three: local goods we like and where to find them!

Ninety-Nine Things We Like - Part One - Giving Tuesday Edition

Here is the first part of our list of ninety-nine things (places, groups, people, etc) that we like.  Our theme for today is Non-Profits and Charities, primarily because we want to make sure these folks get their names out there, but also because it is Giving Tuesday (#GivingTuesday) and apparently that means people are looking for worthy organizations to shower with cash today specifically.

Well look no further, below is a well-cultivated list of organizations doing good work in Chicago to make things better for us all.  We kept annotation to a minimum, but you are welcome and encouraged to click through to their websites and learn more about them.  Most of them fall into one of two categories: 1) "hey, we help queer people/youth live healthier and happier lives", 2)"hey, we help people gain access to food in the city, either growing it or just in general, yay."  Other than that, there are a couple wildcards.

1. Windy City Performing Arts - the organization in which Kristl and Rachel met, there is an SSAA chorus (Windy City Treble Quire) and a TTBB chorus (Windy City Gay Chorus) and the groups are having their combined concert this Saturday at 5pm and 8pm.

2. Felines and Canines -Edgewater-based no-kill shelter housing ~80 cats and ~20 dogs, they have a safe, beautiful space for animals, and a very high adoption rate.

3. Chicago House - Chicago House and Social Service Agency serves individuals and families who are disenfranchised by HIV/AIDS, LGBTQ marginalization, poverty, homelessness, and/or gender nonconformity by providing housing, employment services, medical linkage and retention services, HIV prevention services, legal services, and other supportive programs.

4. Transformative Justice Law Project of Illinois - TJLP is a group of radical activists, social workers, and organizers who provide support, advocacy, and free, holistic advocacy and criminal legal services to poor and street-based transgender people in Illinois.

5. El Rescate - is a project of the Puerto Rican cultural center that provides identity-affirming housing to homeless LGBTQ youth, some being HIV positive, and support services to assist with their transition to independence.

6. ONE Northside - is a community action organization composed of community members (like churches and credit unions) as well as concerned individuals that work with lawmakers to make social change.

7. Project Fierce - Project Fierce Chicago is a grassroots collective of radical social workers, housing advocates, and young people who are working together to establish identity-affirming transitional housing in ChicagoProject Fierce’s mission is to reduce LGBTQ youth homelessness in Chicago by providing transitional housing and support services to homeless LGBTQ young adults.

8. The Night Ministry - The Night Ministry is a Chicago-based organization that works to provide housing, health care and human connection to members of our community struggling with poverty or homelessness. Through the Night Ministry's Health Outreach Bus, Youth Outreach Van, and Youth Shelter Network, they work on the ground in Chicago neighborhoods to reach adults, teens, pregnant and new moms who have nowhere else to go.

9. Howard Brown - Howard Brown Health Center exists to eliminate the disparities in health care experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people through research, education and the provision of services that promote health and wellness.

10. Chicago Women’s Health Center - Chicago Women’s Health Center facilitates the empowerment of women and trans* people by providing access to health care and health education in a respectful environment where people pay what they can afford.

11. Greater Chicago Food Depository - The Food Depository, founded in 1979, makes a daily impact across Cook County with a network of 650 pantries, soup kitchens, shelters, mobile programs, children’s programs, older adult programs and innovative responses that address the root causes of hunger. Last year, the Food Depository distributed 67 million pounds of shelf-stable food, fresh produce, dairy products and meat, the equivalent of 154,000 meals every day.

12. Care for Real - They help those in the Edgewater community by providing food, clothing and counseling services to those in need. They have on-site food distribution, deliveries to the homebound, a free clothes closet and a case-management program to help clients connect with other services they may need.

13. Greenheart Transforms - Greenheart is a nonprofit committed to connecting people and planet to create a more peaceful and sustainable global community.

14. NeighborSpace - NeighborSpace is the only nonprofit urban land trust in Chicago that preserves and sustains gardens on behalf of dedicated community groups. We shoulder the responsibilities of property ownership so that community groups can focus on gardening. NeighborSpace-protected gardens give young and old alike an opportunity to get their hands in the earth and enjoy nature, right in their own neighborhoods.

15. Peterson Garden Project - hosts community gardens all over the northside of Chicago, recently opened a community kitchen in Edgewater.

16. Advocates for Urban Agriculture - Advocates for Urban Agriculture (AUA) is a coalition of individuals, organizations and businesses working to support and expand sustainable agriculture in the Chicago area, from home- and community-based growing to market gardens and small farms.

So, that's our curated list.  Did we miss any of your favorite organizations?  Are there sustainable or queer organizations that you feel absolutely should be on this list? Please leave a comment or let us know on Facebook or Twitter.  We are always excited to learn about more enlivened non-profits doing good work in Chicago.  Or maybe Chicago isn't your home city, but you want to let us know what is going on in Portland or New York.  Start the conversation.  We're listening!

Curious about part two of this series? Go ahead and click here to see it!

A New Direction for Sustainably Queer

Hello Dedicated SQ Readers! Thank you for your patience in the past months as Rachel has been joyfully toiling through her program in Urban Agriculture and Kristl has been setting up her own fabulous acupuncture storefront in Edgewater. Due to this "construction" period, the writing here on SQ has been a little light. You have learned a lot about us, for sure, but there has not been a lot of meat to our posts.

Kristl and Rachel in Florance

Hopefully, as we are swinging into the holiday season and beyond we will be able to change that up for you a little bit. We are looking into a much needed facelift for the blog (because to be honest, we haven't really spent any time on this at all), as well as a few focus topics that are near and dear to our hearts. We will be giving you more cooking posts (because who doesn't love a good cooking post!?) and more posts about green living opportunities and events happening around the city of Chicago. We hope to also have interviews with movers and shakers in the queer, sustainable, and sustainably queer community that you should know (oooooh interviews!). It's going to be cool and hopefully it will be something you will want to share with your friends.

We will, however, be saying adios to our popular feature Nine on the Ninth, love it though you may (insert sad sounds here). We have done ten of those features, and we don't really want to have too much of a good thing. However, as a means of saying goodbye, we will be putting out an homage to Nine on the Ninth (and Oprah) and deliver to you with plenty of time for the holidays a list of Ninety-Nine Things We Like, which are sustainable or queer or, hey, sustainably queer which may also help fill out your shopping list a little bit, or just make your life a little bit easier. So, keep an eye out for that soon. It'll be in digestible chunks, don't worry!

Other than that, Rachel will be writing (unrelated but also awesome) some posts for the Advocates for Urban Agriculture's blog.  AUA is the main organization that works for the rights of farmers, growers, and locally sourced products in Chicago.  It's exciting for her to start to work with these fine folks and do the hard work of making sure that the public at large will make sure they are heard.  We will probably link to Rachel's AUA posts on our Facebook page, for your perusal.  (You may not think that you care about Chicago's weeding ordinance, but if you have a single family home, you very well may, or if you care about the welfare of small farms in the city, their ability to keep up with simple perimeter weeding may impact their ability to stay open or avoid heavy fines.)

That about does it for the planned changes around here. If there's anything specific you'd like us to write about, please let us know. We're definitely open to suggestions!

Nine on the 9th: Hidden Talents

Welcome back to Nine on the 9th (err...16th)! We actually had the text of this done by the 10th, but Kristl took her sweet time finding pictures to add in. Whoops! Sorry we missed September, but we were a little busy. Life is (hopefully) about to calm down for us a bit, as Rachel is graduating from her urban agriculture program on Thursday. We've got a few blog posts planned - let's all cross our fingers that we actually write them! For now, enjoy this list of some of our hidden talents. If we tell you all our favorite hidden talents, then they won't be hidden anymore. So, just be warned, we aren't giving up all the goods.
1. Bacon and eggs: Everyone knows that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. So it's good to know who should be in charge of what part of breakfast. Rachel is incredibly good at making bacon. We like to buy thick cut, humanely-raised, locally-sourced bacon. The result is crispy bacon, with a pleasant chew.  Kristl is a genius at making fried eggs.  She knows how to get the edges crispy, and keep the yolks runny.   If she's adding eggs to something, she has a knack for getting the whites steamed without hardening the yolks.  It's a dream.  It's important to know that Rachel is awesome at bacon and Kristl is a genius at eggs because Rachel ruins eggs and Kristl burns bacon, pretty much without fail.

It was hard to find pics to go along with these facts, so here's a random selfie!

2. Weird voices: About two years into their relationship, Rachel completely confounded Kristl by speaking to her in an alien Kermit the Frog type voice.  Kristl asked, "Where the heck did that come from?!" Rachel responded, "Well, it's just my weird voice for special occasions."  As an only child, Rachel did have to come up with ways to amuse herself, one of which was manipulating her voice.  It doesn't come in particularly handy, but it's weird.

 

3. Monkey feet: Kristl is really good at picking things up with her toes. Like, creepy good.  She's always been good at this.  Turns out this comes in handy (ha ha) when she's wearing a skirt, or a low cut dress, and doesn't want to flash everyone if she has to bend over. Plus, she's pretty much always wearing sandals, so it's convenient. Woo!

 

4. Google Fu: Kristl can find almost anything on the internet. Anything. If it is on the internet, it is meant to be be found by one Kristl Kwai Fah Yuen. She's magic. Rachel will complain about not being able to find such-and-such online and then, a few minutes later, Kristl will send her a barrage of links. Rachel is often outwardly annoyed by this, but secretly loves it.

Rachel all decked out in her farming gear!

5. Finding deals/discounts: This is somewhat related to the previous one, but if you are ever about to buy something, Kristl can probably find you a deal on it. When Rachel was outfitting herself for all-season farmwork, she expected to have to spend hundreds of dollars. After using eBates and shopping around for the best coupon codes and sales, Kristl was able to find all of the gear (work boots, rain pants, Goretex jacket, heavy fleece jacket, light hooded fleece vest, steel toe rainboots, and long silk underwear) for about $250. The Goretex alone retailed for almost $200. This skill definitely came in handy during our leaner months earlier this year!

 

6. Whistling and humming at the same time: Rachel can whistle and hum at the same time. Like an old timey radio is being tuned or a space ship is landing, or, on a good day, in harmony  Every time she does so, Delilah rushes over to make sure everything is okay.

We played NERTS with friends and, as usual, Kristl won.

7. Card games: Kristl is unbelievably good at games, card games especially. She often doesn't even know how she does it. Most recently, we were camping with friends and decided to play Go Fish. Kristl was the second person to go and she somehow managed to get through two full rotations of the group before asking someone for a card they didn't have. She, of course, won by a landslide.

 

8. Accents: We occasionally like to speak in exaggerated, nonspecific Minnesota/Northern Wisconsin or Russian accents. We developed our love of Minnesota/Northern Wisconsin accents independently of each other (Kristl in high school, Rachel in college), but the Russian accent acquisition was a concerted effort. Once, Kristl was in the kitchen and she heard Rachel talking in the living room. She assumed Rachel was on the phone with someone, but when she walked over, she realized Rachel was practicing her Russian accent with a YouTube video.

 

9. Wiggling ears: Rachel can wiggle her ears. Kristl cannot. This makes Kristl jealous on a daily basis. Not really, but Rachel wishes it did. When Kristl tries to wiggle her ears, her eyebrows move. (Rachel is jealous her secret talents are not more useful in real life, although upon further reflection back upon this list, she has some pretty strong tools for entertaining children.)

8-year-old Kristl proudly posing after a baton performance.

Since we are so late posting this, here are some bonus talents: Rachel tends to meow along to songs since she never remembers the lyrics, Kristl is a decent baton twirler, Rachel is great at spotting cats in windows when we're out walking, and Kristl can do some pretty rad makeup.

 

So there you go, hidden talents, and now they are not so hidden anymore. We can make you breakfast, entertain your children, and find you really good deals.  Then Kristl will take you all down in Go Fish.

Epilepsy Complicates Things

Hey everyone, Kristl here. I realized last night that we haven't really talked about Rachel's epilepsy diagnosis, save for a brief mention in our sustainable living update. It's a big focus of our lives right now, so I think it's time to share more about it. She had her first seizure in 2006, but was misdiagnosed with panic attacks. Her seizures tend to present with a blank stare, a feeling of panic, stomach churning, and occasional smells/sounds. She continued having these episodes off and on for the next 7 years, with nothing seeming to help. Doctors sent her to psychiatrists, who put her on anti-anxiety meds, which sometimes worsened the seizures. When we started dating in 2011, she told me about the panic attacks and I thought it was an odd presentation, but didn't really question the diagnosis. A year and a half later, after witnessing many of these so-called "panic attacks," I realized that I they might be seizures. I did a lot of research before mentioning my hunch to Rachel, as I didn't want her to freak out. When I was pretty sure I was right, we took our concerns to our primary care physician. Unfortunately, she told Rachel that if there wasn't a motor component, it was unlikely she was having seizures (wrong). Rachel asked for a CT scan and the doctor hemmed and hawed, saying that she could write the script, but would then have to explain it to the insurance company. Rachel pressed on and got her to begrudgingly write the script, but then we couldn't afford the scan, since it wasn't "medically necessary."

Fast forward to October, 2013. We were doing a strict eating plan, gearing up for our wedding, and she was working out the details of applying to school and possibly quitting her job. On the morning of Thursday, October 24, 2013, I was lying in bed awake when Rachel started smacking her lips. This was frequently a precursor to her episodes, so I did what I normally do, which is hold her hand until the seizure passes. This time, however, after smacking her lips, she let out an animalistic wail and then her entire body started seizing. The seizing stopped relatively quickly (though it felt like ages), and she lay there, unresponsive, foaming at the mouth, making a guttural sound when she breathed. It was one of the scariest moments of my life.

All hooked up after being all shook up

I called 9-1-1, and the paramedics took her to the ER. I followed shortly, bringing a bag with socks, a book, her phone, and a charger, but forgetting her glasses and wallet - way to go, me! She underwent blood tests and a CT scan in the ER before they decided to admit her. While she was in the hospital, she got an EEG, which showed significant seizure activity, and an MRI, which showed a congenital sclerosis on her right temporal lobe. She was diagnosed with epilepsy and put on medication.

Unfortunately, the medication hasn't been working that well. She's had clusters of seizures in the months since her grand mal, and each time her neurologist has upped her dose. She'd feel better for a bit, but then experience seizures again. We were really hoping it would work, since it's the one that has the least amount of side effects.

This past Monday night (May 19, 2014), she had another grand mal seizure. Thankfully, my sister was visiting, so I didn't have to take care of everything myself. She was an enormous help. This time around, she was only in the ER for a few hours before being discharged. She's recovering more quickly than she did in October, but she did have two more small seizures last night. This is typical, as seizures usually cluster, but it's pretty stressful. We're meeting with the neurologist tomorrow to discuss changing her medication.

As we've mentioned previously, I'm in the process of moving my acupuncture practice to a new office. This is a huge, exciting, very expensive endeavor. As can be expected (even though I was hoping it wouldn't be true for me), there have been numerous delays with the construction and I've been without a regular practice space for the month of May. This has left us with very little in the way of income for this month and unexpected medical bills are not a pleasant surprise.

We've set up a YouCaring fundraiser page to help raise money to pay for Rachel's medical expenses and help us pay for some household bills for the month. We're very close to being funded, so if you can share it or have a bit of money to spare, we would greatly appreciate it. If you have any questions, have gone through a similar struggle with a misdiagnosed/difficult-to-control seizure disorder, or have advice for Kristl on how to deal with the fear and stress (mild PTSD?) that goes along with this situation, let us know. We'd love to hear from you.

Here's the link to the fundraising page again: http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/shaking-the-money-tree-to-fund-fewer-seizures/181030!